Brand Window - Audience - Homeowners


FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

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Questions

1. The windows in our new home have gold-colored labels on the inside edge of the frames stating that they have been rated in accordance with AAMA/WDMA/CSA 101/I.S.2/A440 and NFRC 100. What does this mean?  + Answer
2. My windows have AAMA certification labels on them; what is my warranty?  + Answer
3. I understand that several certification agencies use the AAMA standards, and also use gold labels. How can I be sure my windows are actually certified by AAMA?  + Answer
4. Is removal of the AAMA Gold Label (sticker) prohibited? Why should it be kept in place?  + Answer

Answers

1. The windows in our new home have gold-colored labels on the inside edge of the frames stating that they have been rated in accordance with AAMA/WDMA/CSA 101/I.S.2/A440 and NFRC 100. What does this mean?

AAMA/WDMA/CSA 101/I.S.2/A440 is the standard/specification for windows, doors, and skylights. It provides standards for air leakage, water penetration, structural strength and forced-entry resistance.

Certain material and component requirements are also included. For example, aluminum used in sash, frame or other structural members must be of commercial quality and meet certain alloy and strength requirements.

Paint applicators and certain critical components such as weatherstrip, sealants, glazing tapes and hardware (rotary operators, sash balances, friction hinges and roller assemblies) must meet requirements of the AAMA Verified Components program.

NFRC 100 is a thermal performance standard. NFRC is the National Fenestration Rating Council, a non-profit collaboration of window, door and skylight manufacturers and suppliers; utilities, building trade associations; government agencies and consumer organizations. NFRC was founded to establish an energy performance rating and labeling system for windows, doors and skylights.

The three basic terms used to express thermal performance of a window, door or skylight are: U-Factor, SHGC, and VT.

  • The U-Factor measures how well a product prevents heat from escaping from the room. U-Factors generally fall between 0.20 and 1.20; the lower the number, the better.
  • SHGC is the abbreviation for Solar Heat Gain Coefficient, which measures how well a product blocks heat caused by sunlight. SHGC is expressed as a number between 0 and 1; the lower the number, the lower the heat gain.
  • VT is the abbreviation for Visible Transmittance, which measures how much light comes through a product. It is expressed as a number between 0 and 1; heavily tinted products have a lower VT.


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2. My windows have AAMA certification labels on them; what is my warranty?

AAMA does not impose specific warranty requirements on its licensees. Please contact the manufacturer directly for warranty provisions.

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3. I understand that several certification agencies use the AAMA standards, and also use gold labels. How can I be sure my windows are actually certified by AAMA?

Only genuine AAMA labels include the AAMA logo on the far left end.

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4. Is removal of the AAMA Gold Label (sticker) prohibited? Why should it be kept in place?

The labels have been developed and tested over the years for permanent adhesion and resistance to moisture, sunlight, UV and weathering. They will not come off in one piece, and the remainder of the labels and the residue may be impossible to completely remove without damage to the surface to which they were adhered. Removing the label voids the certification of the product. In addition, removal of the label may also void the manufacturer’s warranty.

The homeowner should also check for any local building code provisions that require either structural or thermal testing and/or certification of the window or door. Removal of the label could potentially put the homeowner at odds with the local Building Department (either now or in the future) and potentially at great expense. Also, in some locations, certification may be required by insurance agencies which is confirmed by product labeling.

Finally, without the label in place, any future owner of the home may have no information as to the age of the product, the manufacturer (in case of the need for repair or replacement parts) or the product ratings (either structurally or thermally), which may be necessary to prove building code compliance. Florida homeowners should pay particular attention to the two preceding sentences, as building code compliance is particularly important in this area. The state of Florida has a mandatory product approval program in place; the product labels are the only way to prove compliance with these regulations.

The above information is strictly in the homeowner’s best interest; AAMA derives no benefit from the labels remaining in place.

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